Illinois Data-Driven Health & Justice

The state of Illinois and select local jurisdictions are official partners in the White House Data-Driven Justice Initiative (DDJ). Launched in June of 2016, DDJ is a nationwide effort to reduce the financial and human costs associated with incarcerating people in local jails who may have complex needs but do not pose a risk to public safety.

Data-Driven Health and Justice Conference

The Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority and the Illinois Hospital Association sponsored a one-day conference on key strategies and programs that jurisdictions in Illinois and across the country have used to divert people with mental illness and substance use disorders from deep-end justice and health systems involvement.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Pollard Auditorium
The Forum at Carle
Carle Foundation Hospital
611 West Park Street
Urbana, IL 61801



Data-Driven Health and Justice Conference Materials

Introduction – How Illinois is Poised for Data-Driven Health & Justice

Presentation – “Superutilizers”: Opportunities to Improve Outcomes & Reduce Costs

  • John Maki, Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority - Download Presentation
  • Lynn Overmann, White House Office of Science and Technology
  • Stephen Brown - University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System - Download Presentation

Break-out Sessions

Title

Presenter

Presentations

Additional Materials

Data Sharing Strategies – How to Address Superutilizers within the Confines of Confidentiality

Gerald (Jud) DeLoss
Greensfelder, Hemker and Gale P.C.

 

 

How Being Trauma-Informed Improves Responses in Intercepts 0 and 1 and Innovations Across the State

Michelle Rock & Mary Gubbe Lee
Illinois Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health and Justice
Representatives from Lake County


 

Familiar Faces, King County (Seattle), Washington

Travis Erickson & Jesse Benet
King County, Washington
(presenting by video conference)

Economics of Superutilizers

 

Betsy Benito & John Fallon
CSH

 

 

Impact of Trauma on Health Outcomes and High Risk Behaviors and the UCSF Trauma Recovery Center Model

Alicia Boccellari
UCSF Department of Psychiatry

Preparing for Collaborative Data-Driven Projects

 

Lauren Haynes, Erika Salomon &
Hareem Naveed
Center for Data Science and Public Policy, University of Chicago
Representatives from McLean County

 


This event is open to participating DDHJ local sites and other stakeholders: sheriffs, local hospital administrators and staff, police chiefs, community-based organizations, county administrators, and others.

Data-Driven Health & Justice Webinar Series

As part of their commitment to the White House’s Data-Driven Justice Initiative (DDJ), ICJIA and IHA will produce a webinar series to inform stakeholders about key strategies and programs that jurisdictions in Illinois and across the country have used to divert people with mental illness and substance use disorders from deep-end justice and health systems involvement.




DATA-DRIVEN HEALTH & JUSTICE WEBINAR: TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE AND CIT (LAKE COUNTY)


View the Webinar Recording from May 24, 2017


As part of the Illinois Data-Driven Health & Justice webinar series, the next installment will focus on the role of trauma in crisis and high-utilizer care.

The webinar will feature presentations from the following:

  • Dr. Alicia Boccellari, Chief Psychologist and the Director of Special Programs at the University of California at San Francisco Trauma Recovery Center (TRC), who is an expert in trauma informed care and developed a service delivery model for trauma-informed care via the Trauma Recovery Center.
  • Keith Kaiser, Sergeant of the Strategic Services Unit of the Lake County Sheriff’s Department, who is instrumental in efforts to expand Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for officers in Lake County.

View the Lake County Police Officers Receive Crisis Intervention Training Video Presentation used during the Webinar.




Supportive Housing for DDHJ Communities: How to Start a FUSE Initiative in Illinois


View the Webinar Recording from March 29, 2017

Presenter: Kim Keaton, Senior Program Manager, Strategy & Impact, CSH

This webinar will discuss CSH’s national FUSE (Frequent Users Systems Engagement) model, which is based on data-driven problem-solving, policy and systems reform, and targeted housing and services. Kim will focus on the key components of the FUSE model and the planning steps an interested jurisdiction should go through to create a local FUSE program. Visit the CSH FUSE Resource Center


The Value of Data Analysis in Collaborative Data-Driven Health and Justice Initiatives

View the Webinar Recording from Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Representatives from Data Science for Social Good, a division of the Center for Data Science and Public Policy at the University of Chicago, will discuss work around data to identify superutilizers of health and justice systems. In addition, representatives from McLean County and the Stevenson Center at Illinois State University will discuss their plans to collect and use data to inform local data-driven justice efforts.


Sequential Intercept Model
View the Webinar Recording from Monday, October 24, 2016

View the video recording of the webinar on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Sequential Intercept Model, used in community mapping exercises to identify and develop diversion opportunities.

Michelle Rock, director of the Illinois Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health and Justice, will present the SIM and describe the early intercepts of the model, which can be used to target superutilizers before they enter jail.

Allen Jones, chief deputy of the Champaign County Sheriff’s Office, will describe Champaign County’s recent SIM mapping efforts with a focus on the early intercepts, stakeholder relationships, and challenges encountered.

Data-Driven Health & Justice

A national bipartisan initiative organized by the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy

Educate Illinois criminal justice and health/hospital stakeholders about superutilizers, providing both a high-level and a detailed overview and analysis of how this population cycles through local and state systems.

Introduce data-driven, collaborative strategies that jurisdictions can use to improve outcomes before superutilizers are arrested and enter the justice system.

Inspire Illinois justice and health/hospital systems to implement collaborative data-driven strategies.

Help establish informal/formal network of Illinois jurisdictions whose health/hospital and justice systems are interested in collaborating to improve outcomes.

Fact Sheet

The White House announced the Data-Driven Justice Initiative (DDJ) in June of 2016. DDJ is a nationwide call to action for state and local decision makers to optimize their early diversion work with the help of advancements in data and technology.

Each year, it costs over $22 billion to move the 11 million individuals in America’s local jails. Over 60 % are awaiting trial and not yet convicted, many charged with non-violent misdemeanor offenses. More than half of these 11 million individuals have mental illness, substance use disorder, and other chronic medical conditions. Jailing those with serious mental illness and other chronic medical problems is costly, ineffective, and detrimental to the community.

States, counties, and cities across the country have begun implementing protocols and programs to divert people away from the justice system and into more appropriate care, such as an outpatient treatment for mental illness.

In doing this work, people recognized that services to a small portion of these individuals—the “superutilizers”—are disproportionately costly to the community. Superutilizers often cycle in and out of several community systems including the justice and health systems without a long-term treatment plan.

The goal is for counties to be able to identify and possibly even predict these superutilizers before they are caught in the revolving door of the justice system. The state of Illinois and several Illinois counties have signed on to DDJ in an effort to catch people in need of care before they are chronically involved with the health and justice systems.

For more information

The full DDJ fact sheet, including a list of participating counties and organizations, can be found here.

Press Release

The state of Illinois and select local jurisdictions are official partners in the White House Data-Driven Justice Initiative (DDJ). Launched in June of 2016, DDJ is a nationwide effort to reduce the financial and human costs associated with incarcerating people in local jails who may have complex needs but do not pose a risk to public safety. Using cross-system data, improved technology and collaborative strategies, state and local decision makers can achieve better outcomes, particularly by focusing on a special population of “superutilizers” of emergency departments and jails.

John Maki, Illinois Criminal Justice Authority (ICJIA) Executive Director, is leading the state’s participation in the DDJ Initiative. “If we can identify [superutilizers] in real-time when or before they enter the system, we can treat them, rather than letting them sink deeper into our criminal justice system, and into a costly cycle of dependence,” said Maki.

As part of DDJ, the ICJIA is joining with the Illinois Health and Hospital Administration (IHA) and other partners to coordinate a statewide solution-focused convening for county health and justice leaders. The one-day convening and ongoing learning collaborative will provide local stakeholders and decision makers with the opportunity to share best practices and learn from each other about identifying and addressing the needs of superutilizers.

Participation in the DDJ Initiative is consistent with and complementary to bold efforts underway in Illinois to reform the health and justice systems. In 2015, Governor Bruce Rauner began a Health and Human Services Transformation process and created the Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform, an initiative to reduce Illinois’ incarcerated population by 25 percent by 2025.

The full press release can be found here.

Resources

Center for Data Science and Public Policy
University of Chicago
The Center for Data Science and Public Policy (DSaPP) at the University of Chicago is a joint center between The Harris School of Public Policy and the Computation Institute to further the use of data science in policy research and practice. DSaPP is a leader in applied data science for public.


Data-Driven Justice Playbook: How to Develop a System of Diversion
National Association of Counties
The Data-Driven Justice (DDJ) Playbook outlines six strategic steps communities can take when building a system that diverts high-utilizers from courts and jails to appropriate treatment and services in the community that can provide long-term stability to individuals’ health and social circumstances. The six strategic steps include building community support, identifying the target population, creating a system-wide diversion strategy, creating linkages to service providers, delivering ongoing services effectively and leveraging available funding to support care and services. In addition to providing communities with a roadmap to implement a DDJ system, the discussion draft highlights innovative practices, includes short case studies of effective local strategies and provides answers to questions about how to share health data and comply with HIPAA.
Read more>>


Data Science for Social Good
University of Chicago
The Data Science for Social Good Fellowship is a University of Chicago summer program to train aspiring data scientists to work on data mining, machine learning, big data, and data science projects with social impact. Working closely with governments and nonprofits, fellows take on real-world problems in education, health, energy, public safety, transportation, economic development, international development, and more.


Familiar Faces Initiative
King County, Washington
The Familiar Faces initiative is systems coordination for individuals who are high utilizers of the jail (defined as having been booked four or more times in a twelve-month period) and who also have a mental health and/or substance use condition.
A future vision for how systems can better serve “familiar faces” and improve their health and social outcomes, the quality of services they receive and lower costs has been developed by the Design Team. This work began in 2014, when a group of senior leaders from within the community and King County (the Management Guidance Team) commissioned a Design Team to map the current state for this population as they transition from the jail to and within the community.


FUSE Resource Center: Housing resources (CSH)
The Fuse Resources Center contains the valuable information needed to create a supportive housing initiative for super utilizers (frequent users) of jails, hospitals, healthcare, emergency shelters, and other costly public systems. Within these pages you will access how-to guidance, templates, research and case studies.
Read more>>


HIPAA Guidance for information sharing (HHS.gov)
A HIPAA Q&A on health information privacy as it relates to criminal justice data sharing.
Read more>>


Illinois Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health and Justice
The Illinois Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health and Justice is a statewide entity working to equip communities to appropriately respond to the needs of persons with behavioral health disorders that are involved with the criminal justice system. Based in Rockford and serving all Illinois counties, the Center promotes, coordinates, and provides training to communities looking to implement jail diversion programs and problem-solving courts for mentally ill and/or substance abusing offenders.


National Center for Complex Health and Social Needs
Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers
The Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers has announced plans to establish a national center to improve care for high-need patients who experience poor outcomes despite extreme patterns of hospitalizations or emergency care. Inefficient and ineffective care of these patients has been identified as a driver of unnecessary health care spending in the United States.


Trauma Recovery Center
University of California, San Francisco
The Trauma Recovery Center facilitates healing for adult survivors of trauma, violence, and loss through an innovative, clinically-proven model of comprehensive care, advocacy, and outreach. We eliminate barriers to healing and inspire survivors to embrace hope.