Federal Programs

Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program
Status:  Current

The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG) was designed to streamline justice funding and grant administration. The program blended funding for Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance (also known as ADAA) and Local Law Enforcement Block Grant programs to provide agencies with the flexibility to prioritize and place justice funds where they are needed most.

JAG funds can be used for state and local initiatives, technical assistance, training, personnel, equipment, supplies, contractual support, and information systems for criminal justice for any one or more of the following purpose areas:

  • Law enforcement.
  • Prosecution and court programs.
  • Prevention and education programs.
  • Corrections and community corrections.
  • Drug treatment and enforcement.
  • Crime victim and witness initiatives.
  • Planning, evaluation, and technology improvement programs.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Program
Status:  Archived

The basic premise underlying the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant (JABG) Program is that both offender-focused and system-focused activities must hold the offender accountable and address the fact that three parties are affected by juvenile crime, the offender, the victim and society. For the juvenile offender, accountability means an assurance of facing individualized consequences through which he or she is made aware of, and held responsible for the loss, damage, or injury perpetrated on a victim. Strengthening the juvenile justice system requires an increased capacity to develop youth competence, to efficiently track juveniles through the system, and to provide enhanced options such as restitution, community service, victim-offender mediation, and other restorative justice sanctions that reinforce the mutual obligations of an accountability-based juvenile justice system.

JABG funds must be spent in one or more of the following 17 purpose areas:

  • Developing, implementing, and administering graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders.
  • Building, expanding, renovating, or operating temporary or permanent juvenile correction, detention, or community corrections facilities.
  • Hiring juvenile court judges, probation officers, and court-appointed defenders and special advocates, and funding pretrial services (including mental health screening and assessment) for juvenile offenders, to promote the effective and expeditious administration of the juvenile justice system.
  • Hiring additional prosecutors, so that more cases involving violent juvenile offenders can be prosecuted and backlogs reduced.
  • Providing funding to enable prosecutors to address drug, gang, and youth violence problems more effectively and for technology, equipment, and training to assist prosecutors in identifying and expediting the prosecution of violent juvenile offenders.
  • Establishing and maintaining training programs for law enforcement and other court personnel with respect to preventing and controlling juvenile crime.
  • The establishment of juvenile gun courts for the prosecution and adjudication of juvenile firearms offenders.
  • The establishment of drug court programs for juvenile offenders that provide continuing judicial supervision over juvenile offenders with substance abuse problems and the integrated administration of other sanctions and services for such offenders.
  • Establishing and maintaining a system of juvenile records designed to promote public safety.
  • Establishing and maintaining interagency information-sharing programs that enable the juvenile and criminal justice systems, schools, and social services agencies to make more informed decisions regarding the early identification, control, supervision, and treatment of juveniles who repeatedly commit serious delinquent or criminal acts.
  • Establishing and maintaining accountability-based programs designed to reduce recidivism among juveniles who are referred by law enforcement personnel or agencies.
  • Establishing and maintaining programs to conduct risk and need assessments of juvenile offenders that facilitate the effective early intervention and the provision of comprehensive services, including mental health screening and treatment and substance abuse testing and treatment to such offenders.
  • Establishing and maintaining accountability-based programs that are designed to enhance school safety.
  • Establishing and maintaining restorative justice programs.
  • Establishing and maintaining programs to enable juvenile courts and juvenile probation officers to be more effective and efficient in holding juvenile offenders accountable and reducing recidivism.
  • Hiring detention and corrections personnel, and establishing and maintaining training programs for such personnel to improve facility practices and programming.
  • Establishing, improving and coordinating pre-release and post-release systems and programs to facilitate the successful re-entry of juvenile offenders from state and local custody in the community.

Illinois’ award is based on a formula. The formula provides a minimum allocation of 0.5 percent of the available funds to each state, with the remaining funds allocated to each eligible State based on relative share of the aggregate of all states’ population of people under the age of 18. States must allocate 75 percent of the total JABG award to eligible units of local government.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Program
Status:  Current
The National Institute of Justice awards Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Program grants to states trying to defray the costs associated with post-conviction DNA testing of forcible rape, murder, and non-negligent manslaughter cases in which actual innocence might be demonstrated. Program funds may be used to review such post-conviction cases and to locate and analyze biological evidence associated with these cases.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
National Instant Criminal Background Check System Reporting Improvement Program
Status:  Current
The National Instant Criminal Background Check System Reporting Improvement Program provides assistance to states to improve the completeness, automation, and transmittal of records to state and federal systems used to conduct background checks. Such records include criminal history records, records of felony convictions, warrants, records of protective orders, convictions for misdemeanors involving domestic violence and stalking, records of mental health adjudications, and others that may disqualify an individual from possessing or receiving a firearm under federal law. Helping states to automate these records also reduces delays for law-abiding gun purchasers.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Paul Coverdell National Forensic Sciences Improvement Act
Status:  Current
The Paul Coverdell National Forensic Sciences Improvement Act authorizes funding to improve the quality, timeliness, and credibility of forensic science services for criminal justice purposes. Act funding is directed to crime laboratories and medical examiners’ offices based on population and crime statistics. The program permits funding for facilities, personnel, computerization, equipment, supplies, education, and training.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Prison Rape Elimination Act
Status:  Current
The Prison Rape Elimination Act was passed in 2003 to provide for the analysis of the incidence and effects of prison rape in federal, state, and local institutions and to provide information, resources, recommendations, and funding to protect individuals from prison rape. 
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Project Safe Neighborhoods
Status:  Current
Project Safe Neighborhoods is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing these programs with additional tools necessary to be successful. This funding is used to hire new federal and state prosecutors, support investigators, provide training, distribute gun lock safety kits, deter juvenile gun crime, and develop and promote community outreach efforts as well as to support other gun violence reduction strategies.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Project Safe Neighborhoods, Anti-Gang Initiative
Status:  Archived

Project Safe Neighborhoods, Anti-Gang Initiative (PSN AGI) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gang crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing these programs with additional tools necessary to be successful.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Program
Status:  Current
The Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Program provides funding for treatment programs in a correctional setting and is available to the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) and Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice. These funds are used to implement residential, jail-based, and aftercare programs. 
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act
Status:  Current
The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-248). The Act provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States. The Act aims to close potential gaps and loopholes that existed under prior law and generally strengthens the nationwide network of sex offender registration and notification programs. The program offers competitive awards administered to states by the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Victim Assistance Discretionary Grant Training (VADGT) Program
Status:  Current

Under this award, the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) made $25 million available to eligible state victim assistance programs to apply for noncompetitive funding to support training and technical assistance for victim assistance service providers and others who work with crime victims. Illinois was awarded $946,913 for federal fiscal year 2015.

The purpose of this program is to provide each state and territory with funding to support training and technical assistance for victim assistance grantees and others who work with crime victims. States are encouraged the use of the funds to enhance existing State Victim Assistance Academies (SVAAs) or to establish new ones. These funds can also support statewide training initiatives, crime victim related conferences, basic training for new programs for underserved victims, and scholarships to service providers and others who work with crime victims. As with all VOCA awards, states would have the year of the award plus three years to spend these funds.

Illinois has an extensive network of coalitions and statewide issue groups that are supported by strong legislation dedicated to victim rights and services. Yet, Illinois is a large, diverse state that still has many unmet needs in the victim services field. Local agencies throughout the state struggle to meet the training and staffing needs for their services. Issue specific training is available in some areas and increasingly required for some positions, but the availability of training that is affordable and the opportunity to hear state and national experts in many fields is often beyond the reach of local agencies.

Funding from this program will be used to expand training opportunities for victim service advocates throughout the state of Illinois.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Victims of Crime Act
Status:  Current

The Victims of Crime Act is funded with fines paid by offenders convicted of violating federal laws, supports direct services to victims of crime. The Act requires that priority be given to services for victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, child abuse, and other groups identified by the state as underserved victims of crime.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Violence Against Women Act
Status:  Current

Congress first passed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 1994 and reauthorized the Act in 2000. With a reauthorization in 2005, Congress began a new initiative of the S.T.O.P. (Services * Training * Officers * Prosecutors) VAWA program by authorizing grants to states for programs that would improve the response of the criminal justice system to female victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. The program’s objectives include:

  • Providing services to women who are victims of sexual assault and domestic violence.
  • Developing, implementing, and evaluating a plan for training police, prosecutors, judges, circuit clerks, probation officers, and service providers to promote an interdisciplinary approach to sexual assault and domestic violence.
  • Implementing measures that document and assess the response of criminal justice agencies in Illinois to sexual assault and domestic violence.

The Act specifies that states must allocate 25 percent of the funds to law enforcement, 25 percent to prosecution, 30 percent to service providers, and 5 percent to the courts. The remaining 15 percent can be allocated at the state’s discretion.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Violence Against Women Act Arrest Program
Status:  Current
The Violence Against Women Act Arrest Program provides grants to encourage arrest policies and enforcement of protection orders program. This discretionary grant program is designed to encourage state, local, and tribal governments and state, local, and tribal courts to treat domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking as serious violations of criminal law requiring the coordinated involvement of the entire criminal justice system.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Violence Against Women Act Sexual Assault Services Program
Status:  Current
The Violence Against Women Act Sexual Assault Services Program supports the provision of hotline, advocacy, counseling, and outreach services to adults and children at 33 local victim service agencies across Illinois.
Program allocations by fiscal year:

State Programs

Adult Redeploy Illinois
Status:  Current

In response to declining state resources and expanding criminal justice research about best practices in corrections, Illinois passed the Crime Reduction Act of 2009. The Adult Redeploy Illinois (ARI) program was created by the Act to increase alternatives to incarceration for non-violent offenders. Research shows that non-violent offenders are more effectively rehabilitated in community settings, which are also less expensive than prison. ARI provides grants to local jurisdictions to expand their capacity to safely supervise non-violent offenders in the community by investing in evidence-based practices shown to reduce recidivism. In exchange for grant funding, sites agree to reduce by 25 percent the number of non-violent offenders they send to the Illinois Department of Corrections from their target populations.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Bullying Prevention Grant Program
Status:  Archived
The Bullying Prevention Grant Program funds schools or youth-serving organizations to implement and evaluate evidence-based bullying prevention programs in K-12 school settings. 
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Ceasefire
Status:  Archived
The mission of Ceasefire Illinois, a unit at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, is to work with community and government partners to reduce violence in all forms and help design interventions required to better define what should be included in a community or city anti-violence plan. Growing up in communities where violence is an everyday occurrence, youth learn that violence is normal and are thus more likely to use violence or become victims of violence. Ceasefire staff members work to engage this population. Staff members will help change their behavior and connect them to resources that would otherwise be out of reach.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Death Penalty Abolition Fund
Status:  Archived
The Death Penalty Abolition Fund was created by Public Act 725 ILCS 5/119(b),stating that all unobligated and unexpended moneys remaining in the Capital Litigation Trust Fund were to be transferred to the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority for services for families of victims of homicide or murder and for training of law enforcement personnel.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Family Violence Coordinating Councils
Status:  Current

Family Violence Coordinating Councils, at both state and local/circuit levels, establish a forum to improve the institutional, professional, and community response to family violence, including intimate partner abuse, child abuse, abuse against people with disabilities, and elder abuse. The councils engage in education and prevention as well as coordination of intervention and services for victims and perpetrators. They work to improve the administration of justice when addressing family violence.

Program allocations by fiscal year:
Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center for Methamphetamine Pilot Program
Status:  Archived
In response to a growing concern about methamphetamine abuse, in 2006 the state of Illinois provided funds to create a model intervention for youth based at the Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center in Benton, a rural district in south-central Illinois. The Franklin County Juvenile Methamphetamine Treatment Program provides treatment services to youth from 41 counties across central and southern Illinois. 
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Illinois Crime Stoppers
Status:  Current
The Illinois State Crime Stoppers Association is a broad-based crime fighting and crime prevention group that develops and facilitates Crime Stoppers programs throughout Illinois.
Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council
Status:  Archived
With the support of the insurance industry, the General Assembly established the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council in 1991 to combat vehicle theft, insurance fraud, and related crimes. The Council’s responsibilities, as listed in the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act, include assessing the scope of motor vehicle theft, particularly in those areas of the state with the highest theft rates, allocating funds made available for the purpose of the act, and developing and implementing strategies to combat motor vehicle theft. The Act requires that certain insurance companies pay into a special trust fund in the state treasury $1 for each vehicle insured the previous year. Grants are made from this fund to support special auto theft task forces and investigative teams, prosecutions, statewide audits of salvage yards, public education, officer training, and data analysis. 
Program allocations by fiscal year:
Safe From the Start
Status:  Current
The Safe from the Start Program was initiated to address childhood exposure to violence. The program implements and evaluates comprehensive and coordinated community models to identify and respond children ages 0 to 5 who have been exposed to violence in the home or community. Program components include coalition and collaboration building, direct services, and public awareness.
Program allocations by fiscal year:
South Suburban Major Crimes Task Force
Status:  Archived
The South Suburban Major Crimes Task Force serves the residents of the south suburban area of Chicago. The SSMCTF is comprised of 60 municipal, county, and state law enforcement agencies whose purpose is to combine resources to provide comprehensive investigative services in south suburban Cook and Will counties whenever a member agency experiences a serious violent crime. The population of the SSMCTF jurisdiction is approximately 800,000.
Program allocations by fiscal year: