INFONET  
index.cfm

Pat Quinn, Governor

INFONET Links

Home
Security Software (SmartPass) Information
Tech Support
Training Calendar

INFONET FAQs

Child Advocacy Centers
Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

Training Manuals

Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

SERVICE DEFINITIONS

Child Advocacy Centers
Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

INFONET DATA COLLECTION FORMS

Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

INFONET USER GROUPS

Child Advocacy Centers
Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

INFONET EMAIL DISTRIBUTION LISTS

Subscribe to Child Advocacy Centers List
Subscribe to Domestic Violence List
Subscribe to Sexual Assault List

INFONET USER AGENCIES

Child Advocacy Centers
Domestic Violence
Sexual Assault

ICJIA

Go to ICJIA Website
Illinois Home

Illinois Gallery

GovBenefits.gov website

Office of the Executive Inspector General

  INFONET | INFONET Information  

INFONET SERVICE DEFINITIONS See ICASA Policy & Procedures for more detailed service descriptions

 

1.        Non-Client Crisis Intervention Non-client crisis intervention is crisis intervention counseling provided to someone who is not assigned a client identification number because s/he does not give a name/identifying information and/or does not wish to become a client of the center or have their case re-opened.  This service is usually provided via hotline but may occur in person (e.g. someone discloses and receives crisis intervention services after an education presentation).

In most cases, this will be a victim-initiated call.  In some cases, it may be a parent, other family member or friend who requests assistance in handling their emotions regarding the sexual assault or sexual abuse of a child, partner, family member or friend.

2.        Client In the case of counseling, a person generally becomes a client when the center has gathered enough information to assign a client identification number or the person seeks additional services from the program subsequent to crisis intervention services.

In the case of advocacy, a person generally becomes a client when the center provides telephone or in-person advocacy services related to medical care or reporting to law enforcement.

A.        Victim Any person of any age who seeks assistance after being sexually assaulted.

B.        Significant Other Any person of any age who seeks assistance in dealing with their own crisis/feelings as a result of the sexual assault of a loved one.  If contact with a significant other is solely focused on services provided to a victim who is a center client, this is significant other consultation (see #4 below) and the significant other does not become a client.

3.        Counseling Verbal assistance intended to be helpful and supportive for victims of sexual assault or the significant other(s) of a victim.

A.        In-Person Counseling Face-to-face verbal assistance intended to be helpful and supportive for victims of sexual assault or the significant other(s) of a victim.

B.        Telephone Counseling Time spent on the hotline or on another telephone line providing assistance to a center client who is dealing with sexual assault. 

C.        Family Counseling Counseling provided to two or more victims or significant others who define themselves as a family unit.

D.        Group Counseling Counseling provided to more than two victims or significant others who meet together on a regular basis over a period of time.  This includes support groups, counseling groups, therapy groups, psycho-educational groups.

4.        Significant Other Consultation Sharing information with a significant other (e.g. parent, guardian) or gathering information from a significant other about a victim being served by the center.  The significant other does not become a client as the result of this contact.  Significant other consultation services are documented in the clients file.

5.        Individual Advocacy Providing assistance, in the company of, or on behalf of, a specific victim or significant other by some other form of intervention on the victims behalf, during proceedings affecting the victim (i.e. accompanying victim to hospital or States Attorneys office).

A.        Medical Advocacy Individual advocacy related to medical procedures both at the hospital/medical care facility and during follow-up care.

B.        Criminal Justice Advocacy Individual advocacy with police, sheriff, states attorney, judge, court system.

C.        Other Advocacy Individual advocacy on behalf of victim/significant other(s) with school personnel, social service agencies, etc.

6.        Information/Referral Responding to telephone or in-person requests for information about sexual assault, location of additional resources on the subject of sexual assault or location/explanation of other resources and services which may be helpful to a victim or significant other.

7.        Institutional Advocacy Affecting change in the policies and procedures of an agency or institution in order to insure more sensitive, responsible treatment of sexual assault victims.  This may be done in-person, on the telephone or in written communication.  Infonet lists a variety of institutions with whom center staff may advocate such as law enforcement, medical and hospital, school, etc.

8.        Professional Training Providing in-depth education, skills building, and evaluation of skills in order to prepare others to helpfully and effectively intervene on a victims behalf.  This is usually offered to groups of people, although an individual may receive a one-to-one training session.  Infonet lists a variety of training audiences including law enforcement medical and hospital, clergy, etc.

9.        Public Education A presentation to groups of people (perhaps an individual) on the subject of sexual assault, the myths associated with its origins and perpetration, the effect of sexual assault on the victim, the characteristics of an offender, etc., that is designed primarily to inform an audience (as contrasted to imparting skills and evaluating use of skills which transpires in training).  Infonet lists a variety of public education audiences including school age audiences, civic organizations and others.

10.      Volunteer Training Providing in-depth education, skills building and evaluation of skills in order to prepare volunteers to provide services to victims and significant others. 

11.      Volunteer In-service Training Additional training provided to expand volunteer skills.

12.      Media Contacts Time spent contacting print, radio and/or television media outlets regarding sexual assault and related issues.

 

News & Publications

News & Publications

Analysis of Shelter Utilization by Victims of Domestic Violence-Quantitative Analysis


The Analysis of Shelter Utilization by Victims of Domestic Violence project was funded by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA) in the spring of 2008 to address two primary issues: 1) The shelter and service utilization patterns and outcomes and housing needs of women who are domestic violence victims, and 2) the stages in the process by which they make changes in their situation.



[PDF (230 pp.) ]

Assessment of the Current Response to Domestic Violence in Chicago


The following are a post-recording of the presentation given at the DVACC Summit Series opening October 8, 2009 in Chicago.



[View the Presentations ]

InfoNet database reveals Illinois domestic violence victim demographics, trends


While physical abuse was the top primary presenting form of abuse for domestic violence victims seeking services between 1998 and 2005, victims seeking assistance for emotional abuse increased from 25 percent in 1998 to 41 percent in 2005, according to InfoNet, a web-based data collection and reporting system used by victim service providers in Illinois.



[PDF (2 pp.) ]

The response to domestic violence - Updated protocol aids law enforcement officials, state's attorneys, and the judiciary in addressing abuse issues


The impact of domestic violence on society reaches far beyond devastation inflicted on the lives of its victims and their children. Its adverse impact extends to the health care, criminal justice, court, child welfare, mental health, and social service systems.



[PDF (8 pp.) ]

Analysis of InfoNet Data from Domestic Violence Agencies: Executive Summary


This summary highlights the findings from analysis of domestic violence service data obtained by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA) through its InfoNet system between the period of January 1, 1998 and December 11, 2005.



[PDF (43 pp.) ]

Analysis of InfoNet Data from Domestic Violence Agencies: Full Report


The analyses presented here were conducted in order to look more fully at these issues. They build upon our previous work examining both domestic violence data and sexual assault/abuse information for the Illinois Criminal Justice and Information Authority. The domestic violence data with which we worked made clear that there were differences in the circumstances of abuse, paths into referral and assessed service need for some groups, including victims of color versus those who were White, older versus younger victims and victims in rural settings compared to those in Cook County.



[PDF (165 pp.) ]

Web-based Technology Paves the Way to Better Services for Victims of Crime


Millions of dollars are designated for victim services each year in Illinois, but until recently it’s been hard to accurately measure the benefit of those funds on clients and programs. Limitations in the collection and analysis of data made it difficult to track trends in victimization and direct resources to where they were most needed.



[PDF (8 pp.) ]

State Features

Living in Illinois
[ Contact INFONET  |  INFONET Privacy Policy  |  Kids' Privacy  |  Web Accessibility  |  Comments ]
Copyright © 2009 INFONET System