The Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority
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ICJIA Grant Programs

The Federal and State Grants Unit (FSGU) oversees the federal and state assistance programs that the Authority administers, including 10 federal initiatives (the Byrne Memorial Fund, the Victims of Crime Act, the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, the Violence Against Women Act, etc.) and the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act. FSGU is responsible for developing program strategies, recommending programs to be funded, and monitoring all awards.

(For more information about ICJIA grant programs listed below, please call the Authority, 312-793-8550 or email cja.grantsunit@illinois.gov)

NOTE TO GRANTEES: All agencies receiving federal funds are now required to obtain a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number. The DUNS number can be obtained from Dun and Bradstreet, Inc., online at www.dunandbradstreet.com or by calling 1-866-705-5711. Please contact your grant monitor with questions.

Adult Redeploy Illinois

Adult Redeploy Illinois was established by the Crime Reduction Act (Public Act 96-0761) to provide financial incentives to local jurisdictions for programs that allow diversion of non-violent offenders from state prisons by providing community-based services. Grants are provided to counties, groups of counties, and judicial circuits to increase programming in their areas, in exchange for reducing the number of people they send to the Illinois Department of Corrections. The Crime Reduction Act is based on the premise that crime can be reduced and the costs of the criminal justice system can be controlled by understanding and addressing the reasons why people commit crimes. It is also based on the premise that local jurisdictions (judicial circuits or counties) know best what resources are necessary to reduce crime. Results expected with Adult Redeploy Illinois include reduced prison overcrowding; lowered cost to taxpayers; and an end to the expensive vicious cycle of crime and incarceration.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 | 2015 ]

Chicago Area Project (CAP)

Chicago Area Project (CAP) was founded on the concept that every neighborhood has the leaders it needs to solve its own problems. CAP identifies community leaders and supports their grassroots efforts to mobilize residents to take responsibility for guiding young people. Through implementation of special projects and on-going advocacy efforts, CAP has made substantial contributions to change in juvenile justice, workforce development, welfare and other systems that impact people in need.

CAP uses a three-pronged approach to addressing delinquency and its root causes:

  • Community Organizing involves identifying local leaders and supporting their efforts in mobilizing residents to take responsibility for guiding young people. Working together, community leaders, residents, and youth prioritize neighborhood-specific issues, seek effective solutions, and identify available resources to address them.
  • Direct Services occur through CAP's network of more than 40 affiliates offering educational, cultural, and recreational programs.
  • CAP Advocates with neighborhood groups on behalf of their youth for improvements in schools, juvenile court systems, and employment opportunities.

CAP's Mission:

CAP's mission is to work toward the prevention and eradication of juvenile delinquency through the development and support of affiliated local community self-help efforts in communities where the need is greatest.

CAP's Philosophy:

Chicago Area Project's philosophy is to improve the quality of neighborhood life with a special focus on solving problems faced by young people and their families. The agency believes that residents must be empowered through the development of community organizations so that they can act together to improve neighborhood conditions, hold institutions serving the community accountable, reduce anti-social behavior by young people, protect them from inappropriate institutionalization, and provide them with positive models for personal development.

CAP's Goal:

The goals of Chicago Area Project are to develop special projects and establish locally controlled organizations that implement the directives put forth in Cap's mission and philosophy. Projects and affiliates are mandated to positively impact areas in the Chicago vicinity with high rates of juvenile delinquency or other symptoms of social disorganization.

CAP's Objectives:

  • To develop local leadership broadly representative of the communities that are being served.
  • To conduct an annual community survey to assess needs and develop an action plan with a clear set of goals and objectives.
  • To improve the climate for the positive development of young people by achieving such improvements as increases in educational achievement levels and vocational skills.
  • To develop young people's leadership skills by involving them in youth-initiated community improvement activities or in cooperative projects with adults.
  • To set measurable goals and show progress in improving undesirable conditions.
  • To demonstrate an ability to raise funds, manage staff, and be accountable financially and programmatically.
  • To promote and inform the community about all programs.
  • To develop a referral/resource network with other agencies and institutions.
  • To develop and maintain all contractual record keeping documents as required.
  • when

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 ]

Chicago Area Project (CAP) to Reduce Recidivism (CRR)

This grant will support Chicago Area Project (CAP)�s Community Violence Prevention Program (CVPP) in the South Suburbs. The South Suburban Reducing Recidivism CVPP will be implemented through the Healthcare Consortium of Illinois (HCI).

The CVPP program provides or links youth and young adults with the following range of services, gender-specific where appropriate. For the IDOC target population, the asterisked services will be the primary services provided:

  • Intake, referral, consent, screening, information-sharing procedures
  • Case Management and Reentry plan
  • Mentoring
  • Family support and parenting skills
  • Mental health/ATOD treatment
  • Educational supports (emphasis on obtaining HS diploma or GED)
  • Job/vocation training and development
  • Housing assistance
  • Emotional/social/life skills development
  • Recreational support
  • Crisis supports (clothing, food, medical needs, emergency shelter, etc.)
  • Develop Reentry Plans to incorporate the needs of the youth/young adult

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2014 ]

Chicago Project for Violence Prevention / Ceasefire

The mission of CeaseFire Illinois, a unit at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, is to: a) work with community and government partners to reduce violence in all forms; and b) help design interventions required to better define what should be included in a community or city anti-violence plan.

It is widely understood that violence has a significant financial and emotional impact on individuals, families, and neighborhoods. In addition to limiting investments in neighborhoods and creating an overflowing prison population, the costs to individuals and families in terms of lost lives, broken families, stress, and anxiety are unquantifiable. Growing up in communities where violence is an everyday occurrence, youth learn that violence is normal and are thus more likely to use violence or become victims of violence. In Chicago, like many other cities in the US, violence is one of the leading causes of death for people between 15 and 34 years old. More than eighty-five percent of the 513 homicides in Chicago were the result of gun violence. The majority of victims are young men of color from low economic backgrounds. For these young victims, violence has reached epidemic levels.

CeaseFire recognizes that gun violence is concentrated in communities with high unemployment rates, few business opportunities and limited social service resources. In fact, 79.7 percent of homicides in 2012 took place in only 11 of Chicago�s 23 police districts. In most of these 11 districts, killings were concentrated in two to six police beats. The homicide rates in some of these beats were as high as 144 per 100,000 people astronomically higher than the national average of 4.7 homicides per 100,000 people.

Many CeaseFire program participants are beyond the reach of traditional social support systems. They have dropped out of school, exhausted social services, and may never have been employed. As a result of violence, they are often arrested or taken to the emergency room. As credible messengers, CeaseFire staff members are successful at engaging this population. Staff members will help change their behavior and connect them to resources that would otherwise be out of reach.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2014 | 2015 ]

Death Penalty Abolition Fund

725 ILCS 5/119(b) states that all unobligated and unexpended moneys remaining in the Capital Litigation Trust Fund on the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 96th General Assembly shall be transferred into the Death Penalty Abolition Fund, a special fund in the State treasury, to be expended by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, for services for families of victims of homicide or murder and for training of law enforcement personnel.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 ]

Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program

The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program is the primary provider of federal criminal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions. The JAG Program provides states and units of local governments with critical funding necessary to support a range of program areas in seven purpose areas, including:

  1. Law enforcement.
  2. Prosecution and court programs.
  3. Prevention and education programs.
  4. Corrections and community corrections.
  5. Drug treatment and enforcement.
  6. Crime victim and witness initiatives.
  7. Planning, evaluation, and technology improvement programs.

JAG is awarded to the state based on a formula calculated by the Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistic. The formula is the minimum base allocation which, based on the Congressionally mandated JAG formula, can be enhanced by (1) the state's share of the national population, and (2) the state's share of the country's Part 1 violent crime statistics.

Once the state funding is calculated, 60 percent of the allocation is awarded to the state, and 40 percent to eligible units of local government as direct awards. The 60 percent state allocation is increased by any funds that were awarded to a local jurisdiction whose award was under $10,000. The state must distribute the funds from the less than $10,000 awards to units of local government that were not eligible for a direct award of $10,000 or more. States also have a variable percentage of the allocation that is required to be distributed to units of local government in addition to the direct awards.

View ICJIA JAG Funding Area Priorities >>

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 ]


JAG Supplemental funding allocations:

[ Supplemental 2008 ]

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Justice Assistance Grants Program

American Recovery and Reinvestment ACT (ARRA) Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) can be use for the same purpose as the regular JAG funds, but with a focus on creating or retaining jobs.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2009 ]

Edward Byrne Memorial Discretionary Grants Program

The Edward Byrne Memorial Discretionary Grants Program helps local communities improve the capacity of local justice systems and provides for national support efforts. Funds should be used for purposes mandated by Congress. Applicants are limited to agencies and organizations that were invited to apply.

In 2008, Metropolitan Family Services was invited to apply for a grant to combat elder abuse in the Illinois' Second Congressional District. Metropolitan Family Services partnered with the law enforcement, geriatricians, attorneys and other key services to create the Coordinated Response Initiative to address serious crimes of abuse, neglect and financial exploitation against older adults of Illinois' 2nd Congressional District in Chicago.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2008 ]

Illinois Family Violence Coordinating Council (VC)

The purpose of the Illinois Family Violence Coordinating Council's 23 local family violence coordinating councils and the State council is to establish a forum to share and discuss information in order to promote a coordinated response to family violence in our communities. The Councils work to improve the institutional and professional response to family violence issues. The Councils engage in prevention, education, and the coordination of intervention and services for victims and perpetrators of child abuse, domestic violence, and elder abuse. A goal of the Councils is to contribute to the improvement of the legal system and the administration of justice.

Each Council is judicially led and a local fiscal agent appointed by the judge administers this annual allocation of funds. Funds are used to support a half-time Local Council Coordinator in each Council, as well as coordination of committee work, training, travel, and other related activities as determined by the Local Council Planning Committees.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 | 2015 ]

Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council

In 1991, the Illinois General Assembly established the Illinois Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Council (IMVTPC), an 11-member coalition uniquely comprising law enforcement and insurance industry officials, which has worked tirelessly to curtail vehicle theft, insurance fraud, and related crimes. Staff support to the IMVTPC is provided by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority. For more information about the IMVPTC, click here.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 | 2015 ]

Illinois State Crime Stoppers Fund

The Illinois State Crime Stoppers Fund serves residents throughout Illinois by representing local Crime Stoppers programs statewide, striving to assist law enforcement with solving crimes, apprehending wanted persons, recovery of stolen property and illegal drugs, and promoting crime prevention.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 ]

Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Program

The basic premise underlying the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant (JABG) Program is that both offender-focused and system-focused activities must hold the offender accountable and address the fact that three parties are affected by juvenile crime, the offender, the victim and society. For the juvenile offender, accountability means an assurance of facing individualized consequences through which he or she is made aware of, and held responsible for the loss, damage, or injury perpetrated on a victim. Strengthening the juvenile justice system requires an increased capacity to develop youth competence, to efficiently track juveniles through the system, and to provide enhanced options such as restitution, community service, victim-offender mediation, and other restorative justice sanctions that reinforce the mutual obligations of an accountability-based juvenile justice system.

JABG funds must be spent in one or more of the following 17 purpose areas:

  1. Developing, implementing, and administering graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders.
  2. Building, expanding, renovating, or operating temporary or permanent juvenile correction, detention, or community corrections facilities.
  3. Hiring juvenile court judges, probation officers, and court-appointed defenders and special advocates, and funding pretrial services (including mental health screening and assessment) for juvenile offenders, to promote the effective and expeditious administration of the juvenile justice system.
  4. Hiring additional prosecutors, so that more cases involving violent juvenile offenders can be prosecuted and backlogs reduced.
  5. Providing funding to enable prosecutors to address drug, gang, and youth violence problems more effectively and for technology, equipment, and training to assist prosecutors in identifying and expediting the prosecution of violent juvenile offenders.
  6. Establishing and maintaining training programs for law enforcement and other court personnel with respect to preventing and controlling juvenile crime.
  7. The establishment of juvenile gun courts for the prosecution and adjudication of juvenile firearms offenders.
  8. The establishment of drug court programs for juvenile offenders that provide continuing judicial supervision over juvenile offenders with substance abuse problems and the integrated administration of other sanctions and services for such offenders.
  9. Establishing and maintaining a system of juvenile records designed to promote public safety.
  10. Establishing and maintaining interagency information-sharing programs that enable the juvenile and criminal justice systems, schools, and social services agencies to make more informed decisions regarding the early identification, control, supervision, and treatment of juveniles who repeatedly commit serious delinquent or criminal acts.
  11. Establishing and maintaining accountability-based programs designed to reduce recidivism among juveniles who are referred by law enforcement personnel or agencies.
  12. Establishing and maintaining programs to conduct risk and need assessments of juvenile offenders that facilitate the effective early intervention and the provision of comprehensive services, including mental health screening and treatment and substance abuse testing and treatment to such offenders.
  13. Establishing and maintaining accountability-based programs that are designed to enhance school safety.
  14. Establishing and maintaining restorative justice programs.
  15. Establishing and maintaining programs to enable juvenile courts and juvenile probation officers to be more effective and efficient in holding juvenile offenders accountable and reducing recidivism.
  16. Hiring detention and corrections personnel, and establishing and maintaining training programs for such personnel to improve facility practices and programming.
  17. Establishing, improving and coordinating pre-release and post-release systems and programs to facilitate the successful re-entry of juvenile offenders from state and local custody in the community.

Illinois' award is based on a formula. The formula provides a minimum allocation of 0.5 percent of the available funds to each state, with the remaining funds allocated to each eligible State based on relative share of the aggregate of all states' population of people under the age of 18. States must allocate 75 percent of the total JABG award to eligible units of local government.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 ]

Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Program

The National Institute of Justice awards Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Program (PDNAT) grants to states trying to defray the costs associated with post-conviction DNA testing of forcible rape, murder, and non-negligent manslaughter cases in which actual innocence might be demonstrated. Funds may be used to review such post-conviction cases and to locate and analyze biological evidence associated with these cases.

Postconviction DNA testing has received considerable attention in recent years. Since the advent of forensic DNA analysis, a number of people convicted of crimes have been subsequently exonerated through DNA analysis of crime scene evidence that was not tested at the time of trial. Additionally, newer technologies have substantially increased the successful DNA analysis of aged, degraded, limited, or otherwise compromised biological evidence. As a result, crime scene samples once thought to be unsuitable for testing in the past may now yield DNA profiles. Moreover, samples that previously generated inconclusive DNA results may now be amenable to reanalysis using newer methods.

This discretionary grant award is based on the availability of funds and the strength of the program proposed.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2010 | 2012 | 2013 ]

Methamphetamine Pilot Program

The sum of $1,200,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is appropriated from the General Revenue Fund to the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority for grants and administrative expenses for Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center for Methamphetamine Pilot Program.

In response to a growing concern about methamphetamine abuse, in 2006 the state of Illinois provided funds to create a model intervention for youth based at the Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center in Benton, Illinois, a rural district in the south-central part of the state with farming as its major industry. The Franklin County Juvenile Methamphetamine Treatment Program (FCJMTP) provides treatment services to youth from 41 counties across central and southern Illinois. All of these counties are either rural or contain substantial rural areas. Eligible youth must be between the ages of 10 and 18, meet methamphetamine abuse or dependence criteria, and be subject to a court order to complete treatment. Compared with traditional short-term outpatient programs, the FCJMTP program is intensive and long-term. It provides 6 months of intense (daily) inpatient treatment in a secure setting within the Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center. This phase of the program is limited to 8 clients at any one time with individualized treatment provided by 4 counselors. In-custody treatment is followed by 6 months of aftercare in the community, accompanied by support services and monitored by the same counselors who worked with the youth while in custody. Treatment focuses on teaching drug using youth to identify drug cravings, to recognize situations that trigger drug cravings, and then to resist those cravings through socially appropriate actions. The treatment approach is an adaptation of the Craving Identification and Management (CIM) model, an evidence-based treatment program, modified to fit an incarcerated criminal justice population. Since its inception 120 youth have received services through the FCJMTP. The requested grant funds will support continuation of the FCJMTP program for 12 months.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2014 ]

National Criminal History Improvement Program

The National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) provides discretionary grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics. NCHIP is used to enhance the quality and completeness of the nation's criminal history record systems by providing financial and technical assistance to states for the establishment or improvement of computerized criminal history record systems. NCHIP aims to:

  • Provide direct financial and technical assistance to states to improve their criminal records systems and other related systems in an effort to support background checks.
  • Ensure that infrastructure is developed to connect each state records systems to the FBI records systems and, in turn, to connect each state's background check databases to one another.
  • Provide the training and technical assistance needed to insure that records systems are developed and managed to conform to FBI standards, as well as the most appropriate technologies and that states adhere to the highest standards of practice with respect to privacy and confidentiality.
  • Assess and measure, through systematic evaluation and standardized performance measurement and statistics, progress made implementing improvements in state and national records holdings and background check systems.

NCHIP is a discretionary grant. Illinois's proposed application is judged against all other submissions and funds are awarded based on the availability of funds and the strength of the program proposed.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1996 | 2000 | 2004 | 2006 | 2009 | 2010 ]

Paul Coverdell National Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants Program

The Paul Coverdell National Forensic Sciences Improvement Act Grants Program (NFSIA) awards grants to states and units of local government to help improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science and medical examiner services. Among other things, funds may be used to eliminate a backlog in the analysis of forensic evidence and to train and employ forensic laboratory personnel, as needed, to eliminate such a backlog. State administering agencies may apply for both formula and competitive grants.

Approximately 75 percent of the funds available for NFSIA grants will be allocated among eligible states based on population. Twenty-five percent of the available funds will be allocated among states and units of local government through a competitive process. The average annual number of Part 1 violent crimes reported by each state to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for calendar years 2006, 2007 and 2008, existing resources, and current needs of the potential grant recipient will be considerations in award decisions.

NFSIA funds can be used to:

  1. Carry out all or a substantial part of a program intended to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner services in the state, including those services provided by laboratories operated by the State and those operated by units of local government within the state.
  2. Eliminate a backlog in the analysis of forensic science evidence, including, among other things, a backlog with respect to firearms examination, latent prints, toxicology, controlled substances, forensic pathology, questioned documents, and trace evidence.
  3. Train, assist, and employ forensic laboratory personnel as needed to eliminate such a backlog.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 ]

National Instant Criminal Background Check System Reporting Improvement Program

The purpose of the National Instant Criminal Background Check System Reporting Improvement Program (NARIP) grant is to improve the records utilized by NICS by providing assistance to states to improve the completeness, automation, and transmittal of records to state and federal systems. Such records include criminal history records, records of felony convictions, warrants, records of protective orders, convictions for misdemeanors involving domestic violence and stalking, records of mental health adjudications, and others, which may disqualify an individual from possessing or receiving a firearm under federal law. Helping states to automate these records will also reduce delays for law-abiding gun purchasers.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2010 | 2012 | 2013 ]

President-Elect Security Assistance Reimbursement

President-Elect Security Assistance Reimbursement (PESAR) provided reimbursement funds for state and local agencies that engaged in security-related activities for the President-elect during the period of 11:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) November 4, 2008, through 11:59 p.m. (Eastern Time) January 18, 2009.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2009 ]

Project Safe Neighborhoods

Project Safe Neighborhoods is a nationwide commitment to reduce gun crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing these programs with additional tools necessary to be successful. The Bush Administration committed over $1 billion to this effort in its first 4 years. This funding is being used to hire new federal and state prosecutors, support investigators, provide training, distribute gun lock safety kits, deter juvenile gun crime, and develop and promote community outreach efforts as well as to support other gun violence reduction strategies.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2003 - 2005 Central | 2003 - 2005 Northern | 2006 Central | 2007 Central | 2006 Northern | 2007 Northern | 2008 Central | 2009 Central | 2012 | 2013 ]


Project Safe Neighborhoods, Anti-Gang Initiative

Project Safe Neighborhoods, Anti-Gang Initiative (PSN AGI) is a nationwide commitment to reduce gang crime in America by networking existing local programs that target gun crime and providing these programs with additional tools necessary to be successful.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2006 Central | 2007 Central | 2006 Northern | 2007 Northern ]

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners

The Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) Program assists states and local governments that want to develop and implement substance abuse treatment programs in their correctional and detention facilities, and create and maintain community-based aftercare services for offenders. The goal of RSAT is to break the cycle of drugs and violence by reducing the demand for, use, and trafficking of illegal drugs. RSAT enhances the capability of states and units of local and tribal government to provide residential substance abuse treatment for incarcerated inmates; prepares offenders for their reintegration into the communities from which they came by incorporating reentry planning activities into treatment programs; and assists offenders and their communities through the reentry process through the delivery of community-based treatment and other broad-based aftercare services.

The state's allocation is a base award of 0.4 percent of the total funds available for RSAT. Bureau of Justice Assistance will allocate a portion of the total remaining funds to each participating state in the same percentage that the state's prison population represents relative to the total prison population of all states.

Ten percent of the state award must be set aside for a local correctional or detention facility.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 ]

Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-248). SORNA provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States. SORNA aims to close potential gaps and loopholes that existed under prior law and generally strengthens the nationwide network of sex offender registration and notification programs.

Additionally, SORNA:

  1. Extends the jurisdictions in which registration is required beyond the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the principal U.S. territories, to include also federally recognized Indian tribes.
  2. Incorporates a more comprehensive group of sex offenders and sex offenses for which registration is required.
  3. Requires registered sex offenders to register and keep their registration current in each jurisdiction in which they reside, work, or go to school.
  4. Requires sex offenders to provide more extensive registration information.
  5. Requires sex offenders to make periodic in-person appearances to verify and update their registration information.
  6. Expands the amount of information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders.
  7. Makes changes in the required minimum duration of registration for sex offenders.

SORNA is a competitive award administered to states by the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2012 | 2013 ]

Victims of Crime Act

The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) is a formula grant program awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs' Office for Victims of Crime. ICJIA administers Illinois' VOCA award which is divided into two grants. The Authority administers the VOCA award for victims' assistance, and the Office of the Illinois Attorney General administers the state's VOCA award for victim compensation. VOCA victim assistance is intended to pay for direct services to victims of crime. Services under this grant program are defined as those that:

  1. Respond to the emotional and physical needs of crime victims.
  2. Assist primary and secondary victims of crime to stabilize their lives after victimization.
  3. Assist victims to understand and participate in the criminal justice system.
  4. Provide victims of crime with a measure of safety and security such as boarding-up broken windows and replacing and repairing locks.

Each state grantee receives a base amount of $500,000 for victim assistance. The remaining funds are distributed to each state, based upon the state's population in relation to all other states, as determined by current census data.

Illinois is given latitude in allocating funds, but must give 10 percent to each of the following priority areas:

  • Sexual assault
  • Domestic violence
  • Child abuse
  • Previously underserved populations (victims of federal crimes, assault, robbery, gang violence, hate or bias crimes, intoxicated drivers, bank robbery, economic exploitation or fraud, elder abuse, and survivors of homicide victims)

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 ]

Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funds

The Authority, in keeping with the intent of the ARRA stimulus, has committed to expending the ARRA stimulus funds in accordance with the following principles:

  • Use ARRA funds for program restoration. Proportionately restore current grantees to make up for the last funding cut.
  • Restore funding proportionally across VOCA grantees per funding history. Offer restoration on the basis that applicants would be able to effectively use the funds.
  • Require applicants to indicate retention of jobs, creation of jobs, or other stimulation of the economy.
  • Emphasize return on investment to potential grantees as opposed to simply giving money away. Use (or perhaps provide funding for) cost / benefit analyses.
  • Require applicants to demonstrate program impact that ARRA funding would generate.

Thus, the Authority has designated its VOCA ARRA funds in a manner that will partially reinstate the cuts that were made under the VOCA FFY08 award to the two largest VOCA designations, the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ICADV) and the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault (ICASA), for their existing programs.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2009 ]

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)

The S.T.O.P. (Services - Training - Officers - Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is a formula grant program awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office Violence Against Women. VAWA promotes a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to enhancing victim advocacy and improving the criminal justice system's response to violent crimes against women. It encourages the development and improvement of effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to address violent crimes against women and the development and improvement of advocacy and services in cases involving violent crimes against women. By statute, VAWA funds are distributed by an allocation formula: 30 percent to victim services, 25 percent to law enforcement, 25 percent to prosecution, 5 percent to courts and 15 percent discretionary. All VAWA grant activity must fall within one of the following statutory purpose areas:

  1. Training law enforcement officers, judges, prosecutors, and other court personnel to more effectively identify and respond to violent crimes against women.
  2. Developing, training, or expanding units of law enforcement officers, judges, prosecutors, and other court personnel specifically targeting violent crimes against women.
  3. Developing and implementing more effective police, court, and prosecution policies, and protocols, orders, and services specifically devoted to preventing, identifying, and responding to violent crimes against women.
  4. Developing, installing, or expanding data collection and communication systems, including computerized systems, linking police, prosecutors, and courts or for the purpose of identifying and tracking arrests, protection orders, violations of protection orders, prosecutions, and convictions for violent crimes against women.
  5. Developing, enlarging, or strengthening victim services programs, including sexual assault, domestic violence, and dating violence programs, developing or improving delivery of victim services to underserved populations, providing specialized domestic violence court advocates in courts where a significant number of protection orders are granted, and increasing reporting and reducing attrition rates for cases involving violent crimes against women.
  6. Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs addressing stalking.
  7. Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs addressing the needs and circumstances of Indian tribes in dealing with violent crimes against women.
  8. Supporting formal and informal statewide, multidisciplinary efforts, to the extent not supported by state funds, to coordinate the response of state law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, courts, victim services agencies, and other state agencies and departments, to violent crimes against women.
  9. Training of sexual assault forensic medical personnel examiners in the collection and preservation of evidence, analysis, prevention, and providing expert testimony and treatment of trauma related to sexual assault.
  10. Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs to assist law enforcement, prosecutors, courts, and others to address the needs and circumstances of older and disabled women who are victims of domestic violence or sexual assault, including recognizing, investigating, and prosecuting instances of such violence or assault and targeting outreach and support, counseling, and other victim services to such older and disabled individuals.
  11. Providing assistance to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in immigration matters.
  12. Maintaining core victim services and criminal justice initiatives, while supporting complementary new initiatives and emergency services for victims and their families.
  13. Supporting the placement of special victim assistants (to be known as "Jessica Gonzales Victim Assistants") in local law enforcement agencies to serve as liaisons between victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and personnel in local law enforcement agencies in order to improve the enforcement of protection orders. Jessica Gonzales Victim Assistants shall have expertise in domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and may:
    • Develop, in collaboration with prosecutors, courts, and victim service providers, standardized response policies for local law enforcement agencies, including triage protocols to ensure that dangerous or potentially lethal cases are identified and prioritized.
    • Notify persons seeking enforcement of protection orders as to what responses will be provided by the relevant law enforcement agency.
    • Refer persons seeking enforcement of protection orders to supplementary services (such as emergency shelter programs, hotlines, or legal assistance services).
    • Take other appropriate action to assist or secure the safety of the person seeking enforcement of a protection order.
  14. Providing funding to law enforcement agencies, nonprofit nongovernmental victim services providers, and state, tribal, territorial, and local governments. These funding streams shall be known as the Crystal Judson Domestic Violence Protocol Program and promote:
    • The development and implementation of training for local victim domestic violence service providers, and the funding of victim services personnel, to be known as "Crystal Judson Victim Advocates," to provide supportive services and advocacy for victims of domestic violence committed by law enforcement personnel.
    • The implementation of protocols within law enforcement agencies to ensure consistent and effective responses to the commission of domestic violence by personnel within such agencies, such as the model policy promulgated by the International Association of Chiefs of Police ("Domestic Violence by Police Officers: A Policy of the IACP, Police Response to Violence Against Women Project" July 2003).
    • The development of such protocols in collaboration with state, tribal, territorial, and local victim services providers and domestic violence coalitions.

By statute, OVW will award a base amount of $600,000 to each state. Funds remaining after the allocated base amount will be distributed among the States according to population. The most accurate and complete data compiled by the U.S. Bureau of the Census is used to determine the State populations. By statute, Indian Tribal populations are not included in the population count.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 ]

VAWA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding allocations:

[ 2009 ]


Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Enforcement Grants Program (VAWA Rural)

The Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Enforcement Grants Program (VAWA Rural) recognizes that child, youth and adult victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking living in rural jurisdictions face unique barriers to receiving assistance and additional challenges rarely encountered in urban areas. The geographic isolation, economic structure, particularly strong social and cultural pressures, and lack of available services in rural jurisdictions significantly compound the problems confronted by those seeking support and services to end the violence in their lives and complicate the ability of the criminal justice system to investigate and prosecute domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking cases. In addition, socio-cultural, economic, and geographic barriers create difficulties for victim service providers and other social services professionals to identify and assist victims of these crimes.

The primary purpose of VAWA Rural is to enhance the safety of child, youth and adult victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking by supporting projects uniquely designed to address and prevent these crimes in rural jurisdictions. OVW welcomes applications that propose innovative solutions for achieving this goal. The Rural Program challenges victim advocates, law enforcement officers, pre-trial service personnel, prosecutors, judges and other court personnel, probation and parole officers, and faith- and/or community-based leaders to collaborate to overcome the problem of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and to ensure that victim safety is paramount in providing services to victims and their children.

All eligible applicants must demonstrate that the target area to be served is a rural area or community, as defined by the statute. For the purpose of the VAWA Rural program, a rural area or community is defined as (a) any area or community, respectively, no part of which is within an area designated as a standard metropolitan statistical area by the Office of Management and Budget; or (b) any area or community, respectively, that is (i) within an area designated as a metropolitan statistical area or considered part of a metropolitan statistical area; and (ii) located in a rural census tract.

Funded projects must address three goals. They are to 1) ensure the safety of child, youth, and adult victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking, 2) train professionals who respond to and assist victims by producing and distributing protocols for domestic violence, domestic violence by a law enforcement officer, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking, along with the development and coordination of a training program and training manual for local law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and court personnel, and 3) form multi-jurisdictional training teams consisting of a law enforcement officer, a prosecutor, state's attorney's victim/witness coordinator, a sexual assault advocate, and a domestic violence advocate.

Rural VAWA is a discretionary grant. Illinois' proposed application is judged against all other submissions and funds are awarded based on the availability of funds and the strength of the program proposed. The Authority applies for this grant in even numbered years and the Department of Human Services applies for it in odd numbered years.

By definition of the Act, Illinois is not a rural state, but the area targeted by the 2008 grant proposal does satisfy the definition for being rural.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 1999 | 2004 | 2008 ]


Violence Against Women Act Sexual Assault Services Program

The Violence Against Women Act Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP) was created in the reauthorization of the VAWA in 2005. It is a formula grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Violence Against Women. SASP is the first federal funding stream solely dedicated to the provision of direct intervention and related assistance for victims of sexual assault. Overall, the purpose of SASP is to provide intervention, advocacy, accompaniment, support services, and related assistance for adult, youth, and child victims of sexual assault, family and household members of victims, and those collaterally affected by the sexual assault.

By statute, OVW will award a base amount to each state and territory. Funds remaining after the allocated base amount will be distributed among the states and territories based on population, including Tribal populations. The most accurate and complete data compiled by the U.S. Bureau of the Census is used to determine the populations.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies and under certain conditions private non-profit organizations.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 ]

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Arrest Program

The VAWA Arrest Program provides grants to encourage arrest policies and enforcement of protection orders program. This discretionary grant program is designed to encourage state, local, and tribal governments and state, local, and tribal courts to treat domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking as serious violations of criminal law requiring the coordinated involvement of the entire criminal justice system.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by federal fiscal year:

[ 2011 ]

Violence Prevention Programs

The Illinois General Assembly appropriated $15 million in General Revenue funds to the ICJIA for grants to community organizations specifically for violence prevention programs. These funds have been allocated to Governor Quinn's Illinois Community Youth Summer Jobs Program and to Governor Quinn�s Neighborhood Recovery Initiative.

Community Violence Prevention Programs (CVPP)

CVPP is collaborative effort of public and private agencies that provides pro-social opportunities to youth in underserved communities. CVPP components work to reduce deviant behaviors associated with risk factors, strengthen social skills, and increase parent leadership within the communities.

ICJIA was charged with planning and grant administration for the program�s third year. Governor Pat Quinn budgeted $15 million in grants to support these efforts in 23 communities. Grants made through this program must be spent by October 31, 2013.

CVPP program goals are to:

  • Reduce risk factors and promote protective factors associated with violence through provision of jobs for community youth, adults, and professionals that promote community wellness and healthy behaviors, youth and parent leadership, and caring community environments.
  • Provide community-based services for youth and young adults including social, emotional and job skill development, and mentoring.
  • Building parent leadership within neighborhoods to create a foundation for stronger, healthier communities. Program components include a summer Youth Employment Program that provides job training to young people and wage subsidies to employers who hire them, a Parent Program to build parent leadership and stronger families, and a Reentry Program offering services to ex-offenders returning to their community after a period of imprisonment.

VPP is a state General Revenue funded program unique to Illinois.

Grant Awards by ICJIA

Eligible grantees are state, county, and local agencies.

To see a list of grants administered by county, view the GRANT TRACKER.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 ]

After School Programs (ASP)

Improving the schooling attainment, reducing youth violence, and improving the health and long-term life outcomes of disadvantaged youth are top policy priorities. A growing body of research in psychology, sociology and economics suggests that social-cognitive skills are learned through experience. Youths who live in high-crime areas face additional challenges in developing these skills, since fighting and self-defense are sometimes adaptive strategies in addressing community-based threats to personal safety. These state-funded after-school programs focus on social-cognitive skill development intervention in an effort to help youths develop these skills.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2014 ]

Bullying Prevention Program

The Bullying Prevention Grant Program funds schools or youth-serving organizations to implement and evaluate evidence-based bullying prevention programs in school (K-12) settings.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 ]

Non-Appropriated Fund 318 NRI (318 NRI)

These funds are to be used on an as-needed basis for programs and projects to support the Community Violence Prevention Programs efforts.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 ]

Special Projects (SP)

Funds to implement a wide range of violence prevention activities designed to increase protective factors for violence including those that strengthen families, provide needed services and positive development activities for children and youth (during in-school and out-of-school), and promote safer communities.

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 ]

Violence Prevention Grants from Fund 184 -- Legacy Programs (184 VPG)

These funds are utilized to fulfill The Authority''s mandate to support violence prevention activities throughout the state. Programs include Safe From the Start (assists in the development, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive and coordinated community-based models to identify, assess, and serve primarily young children ages 0-5, who have been exposed to violence in their home and/or community); Illinois Health Cares (a statewide, multi-disciplinary effort to strengthen health care response to domestic, elder, and sexual violence); Choose Respect Illinois (promotes broad community efforts to help youth ages 11-14 form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts); and Collaborative (wide range of programmatic initiatives to help build the capacity of the violence prevention field).

State Fund 184 supports the following Violence Prevention Grant programs (also known as Legacy Programs):

Choose Respect

Choose Respect Illinois (CRI):   CRI is a three-year effort that promotes youth and adult partnerships in violence prevention to help youth ages 11-21 form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts. This approach includes recruiting youth and young adults ages 14-21 and supportive adults who have been trained in the CRI Initiative to plan and implement their local activities with technical assistance from the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority and the CRI Staff Team.

CRI is based on the national Choose Respect program that was developed by the Division of Violence Prevention of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). This national effort is designed to motivate youth to challenge harmful beliefs about dating abuse and take steps to form respectful relationships. Choose Respect supports the development of respectful relationships by:

  • Providing effective messages for youth, parents, caregivers, and teachers that encourage them to establish healthy and respectful relationships; and
  • Creating opportunities for youth and communities to support healthy and respectful relationships. 

CRI, building on the CDC model, was developed to accomplish the following strategic goals:

  • Promote healthy relationships among teens;
  • Engage youth leadership in violence prevention; and
  • Conduct teen dating violence prevention and awareness activities.

CRI uses interactive learning tools, television and radio spots, and podcasts to support positive messages about respectful relationships.  Other learning tools include the Playbook: A Toolkit for Making the Choose Respect Initiative Work in Your Community that contains over 30 activities and a 60-minute video, Dating Matters, designed to help educators, youth-serving organizations, and others working with teens understand the risk factors and warning signs associated with teen dating violence.

To promote community collaboration and reach youth in a variety of settings, each Choose Respect Illinois grantee is made up of an implementing agency and two partner sites that recruit youth to participate in the program and coordinate CRI activities.

Choose Respect Technical Assistance:  Established in 2005, the Illinois African American Coalition for Prevention (ILAACP) is a statewide, membership-based charitable organization that strengthens prevention systems, policies, and programs in underserved communities through culturally-relevant research, training, and advocacy. Since 2008, ILAACP has provided technical assistance and program support for the Choose Respect Grant Program. ICJIA works collaboratively with ILAACP Choose Respect staff to plan and implement the two main grantee trainings and a minimum of four (4) webinars.

Safe from the Start

The Safe from the Start (SFS) Grant Program was initiated after national and local attention was focused on the issue of childhood exposure to violence.  The SFS program implements and evaluates comprehensive and coordinated community models to identify and respond to primarily young children (ages 0-5) exposed to violence in the home or community. SFS Program consists of three major components, Coalition and Collaboration building; Direct Services and Public Awareness. 

Illinois Health Cares

Illinois Health Cares is a statewide, multi-disciplinary effort that works to promote an improved health care response to domestic/intimate partner violence, elder abuse and sexual violence through policy reform, public health approaches, prevention efforts and systems change.  Stakeholders are guided by the principle that collaborative work will result in an overall impact greater than the sum of what might be accomplished by entities working independently.  The grantee coordinates the team of primary partners that will take the lead on the planning and implementation of the initiative.  The team of primary partners must include, at a minimum:

  • A community-based domestic, elder and/or sexual violence victim service program (as applicable)
  • A local public health department
  • At least one hospital
  • At least one clinic or group practice

The primary partners collaborate to ensure the goals outlined below are accomplished. In addition, grantees coordinate an expanded community coalition comprised of a diverse group of additional health care providers and domestic, elder, and/or sexual violence advocates as applicable.  The community coalition should provide support to the primary partners throughout the planning and implementation process, and promote the adoption of any products the initiative develops (e.g., policies, protocols, procedures, public education materials, and training modules).  The community coalition represents the range of ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic characteristics of patients in the community, and the needs of domestic/elder/sexual violence victims (as applicable) of all ages and sexual orientations.  The entire community coalition (primary partners and expanded coalition members) must meet on a quarterly basis, at a minimum. 

Collaborative

There are three Collaborative programs. Details are provided below:

1.  Mental Health America of Illinois (MHAI) is the Illinois Chapter of the national organization Mental Health America. Founded in 1909, MHAI has worked to promote mental health, prevent mental illnesses and improve the care and treatment of persons suffering from mental and emotional disorders.

The School and Community Assistance Team (SCAT) Project, developed by Mental Health America of Illinois in 1999, offers services that lessen the effects of emotional trauma on individuals and communities to help prevent further mental and emotional debilitation in the aftermath of a violent or other traumatic incidents. This is accomplished through a network of over 2,000 volunteers that include police officers, fire fighters, school teachers and administrators, emergency medical professionals, clergy, and mental health professions (such as licensed psychiatrists, psychologists. and social workers). SCAT Teams respond to approximately 25 crises annually across the state. Examples of crises include school shootings, gang incidents, suicides, and other non-violent incidents (such as tornados, car accidents and fires). In addition to recruiting and training volunteers along with maintaining a current volunteer database, other activities of the SCAT Project will include:

  • Consulting with Illinois communities to develop appropriate and proactive crisis plans
  • Educating individuals on crisis and trauma
  • Disseminating educational materials about the role of mental health in crisis and trauma

2.  Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition (ICTC):  In 1987, a dedicated group of civic, business, community, academic, and philanthropic leaders established Voices for Illinois Children (Voices) to develop and promote strategies that improve conditions for all children throughout the state. As a privately funded organization, Voices seeks to educate opinion leaders and policymakers on all issues facing children and families. Over the years, Voices has grown into a powerful and well-respected advocate. Voices unites community leaders and people who care passionately about children into a statewide network that helps establish new policies and implements innovative programs to improve education, health care, and family economics. Voices serves as the fiscal agent for the Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition.

The Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition (ICTC) was convened in 2005 to promote the prevention and treatment of childhood trauma. Recognizing childhood trauma as a public health issue, ICTC brings approximately 65 organizations together (including public and private, clinical, research, advocacy and educational institutions) that are focused on increasing the use of trauma-informed practice and policies.

While it is assumed that children will have a normal, healthy development, ICTC focuses on the prevention and treatment of childhood trauma.  ICTC describes childhood trauma by using the three e’s – event, experience and effect.  A traumatic event happens, it feels threatening or frightening to a child and as a result, the child has long-term developmental, behavioral and physical health problems.  Among other things, events can be things that happen once – like a natural disaster, an accident or being a victim of crime or chronic like physical abuse and neglect or it can include exposure to adverse events like domestic violence or substance abuse or violence in the community.  One of the most difficult aspects of childhood trauma and its prevention is that some of these adverse and often violent events happen within families for generations.

 ICTC increases the capacity of professionals to help trauma-affected children and their families.

  • ICTC reaches over 1,000 people annually ongoing trainings, presentations, and workshops. These learning opportunities touch on a variety of topics related to trauma, including childhood exposure to violence and exposure to the juvenile justice system.
  • The Stories Project is a collection of three DVDs that includes Inside Him (the story of a little boy who cannot express his upset feelings and is targeted at 3-5 year olds), Clingy Thing (the story of a little girl who clings to adults because she is scared and is targeted at 3-5 year olds) and Mobile (focuses on an infant’s reaction to the arguments she hears around her). These DVDs are culturally appropriate and include a board book to help start a discussion between professionals and families about trauma.

Develop a workforce which includes all individuals working with children and families that is trauma-informed

  • ICTC has developed a list of core concepts that should be included in all curricula or training on childhood trauma. At the annual ICTC symposium in July 2013, a guide will be distributed to that guides professionals in approaching college and university administrators to including trauma in curricula for fields that work with children.

3.  Illinois Children’s Mental Health Partnership (ICMHP):  Children’s mental health is a major contributing factor in children’s risk for violence. Risk factors such as high emotional distress, early aggressive behavior, poor peer interaction skills, and frequent conflict in the family increase the likelihood that a child will become a perpetrator or a victim of violence. Therefore children’s mental health is essential in violence prevention.

In 2003, the Illinois General Assembly passed the Children’s Mental Health Act that created the Illinois Children’s Mental Health Partnership (Partnership). The Partnership was mandated to develop a plan to build a children’s mental health system in Illinois to provide comprehensive, coordinated mental health prevention, early intervention, and treatment services for children from birth through age 18.  The Partnership’s Board has over 30 members from a variety of state agencies, mental health and youth serving agencies and several elected officials. 

Much of the Partnerships’ work is done through eight committees and workgroups. These range from the Early Childhood Committee, which seeks to improve mental health of youth from birth to age five by providing mental health early intervention and treatment services, to the School Age Committee, which works to promote increased collaboration and partnerships between schools and school-based mental health programs, community mental health agencies, and juvenile justice agencies to promote social and emotional development in children and youth. 

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 | 2015]

Violence Prevention Grants -- Legacy Programs (PV)

These funds are utilized to fulfill The Authority's mandate to support violence prevention activities throughout the state. Programs include Safe From the Start (assists in the development, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive and coordinated community-based models to identify, assess, and serve primarily young children ages 0-5, who have been exposed to violence in their home and/or community); Illinois Health Cares (a statewide, multi-disciplinary effort to strengthen health care response to domestic, elder, and sexual violence); Choose Respect Illinois (promotes broad community efforts to help youth ages 11-14 form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts); and Collaborative (wide range of programmatic initiatives to help build the capacity of the violence prevention field).

Click a link below to see a list of allocations made for this grant program by state fiscal year:

[ 2013 | 2014 | 2015 ]