News and Analysis
The Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Council's First Cost Benefit Analysis Report on the High Cost of Recidivism
October 20, 2015

The Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Council (SPAC) released the first cost benefit analysis report on the high cost of recidivism and the supplement that fully explains our methodology. SPAC adopted this model and requested technical assistance from the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative because the model has been tested and accepted in the legislative and budgeting processes in Washington State for over 15 years, it was free, and it came with a multi-disciplinary technical assistance team. Using this model allows us to apply the best national research to Illinois-specific crime data. More importantly, the model is the best tool to determine the efficient use of tax dollars to minimize the risk that crime will occur.

View the Illinois Results First: The High Cost of Recidivism Report

View the Illinois Results First: The High Cost of Recidivism Supplement Report

Senate Bill 1848 Elimination of Felony Sentence for Narcotic Violations under 1 Gram
House Bill 4123 Changes to Truth in Sentencing Restrictions
Highlights

Infographic: Prison Resource Consumption by Offense Class

Infographic: Prison Resource Consumption by Offense Class

To illustrate how different offense classes consume resources, SPAC analyzed the data for the average number of exits in each class for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

IDOC Admissions, Exits, and Population Pie Charts

IDOC Admissions, Exits, and Population Pie Charts

IDOC Admissions, Exits, and Population Pie Charts highlights data from State Fiscal Year 2014 and June 30, 2014 Admissions data.

Supplement: Victimization Costs in Bill Fiscal Impact Analyses

Supplement: Victimization Costs in Bill Fiscal Impact Analyses

For the first time this year SPAC is incorporating victimization costs into its analyses. The victimization costs utilized are from the seminal study by the NIJ.

Offender Profiles

Offender Profiles

Who is the average inmate coming out of state prison? What crime did he or she commit? How long did he or she spend in the system? What was his or her experience? To begin answering these questions, SPAC analyzed state prison releases to create an average “profile” using the most often occurring characteristics, as well as average and median lengths of stay.